Sign Up for FILTER Newsletters

Exclusives

FILTER 49: Way Out West: The Art And Music Of Lord Huron

By Breanna Murphy; Art by Ben Schneider on November 9, 2012

 

FILTER 49: Way Out West: The Art And Music Of Lord Huron

“I’ve been dreaming again of a lonesome world, where I’m lost and I’m on my own.” —George Ranger Johnson

George Ranger Johnson, born March 11, 1946, published over two decades of material from 1966 until his last story, “The Ghost on the Shore,” in 1987, in a collection of hardbound, pulp-novel adventures entitled Lonesome Dreams. The author currently resides in Tuscon, Arizona, and it is not known if he will ever finish the series.

Don’t go looking for George Ranger Johnson. For one, his books are all sadly out-of-print. For another, he doesn’t exist. At least, not in reality. His stories belong to someone else.

Read more...

This article is from FILTER Issue 49

FILTER 49: Grizzly Bear: More Songs About Buildings And Food

By Marty Sartini Garner; Photo by Tom Hines on November 7, 2012

 

FILTER 49: Grizzly Bear: More Songs About Buildings And Food

There’s a popular aphorism—coined by Martin Mull but often attributed to Thelonius Monk or Elvis Costello or some other ineffable minister of cool—that suggests that writing about music is akin to dancing about architecture. Logical inconsistencies notwithstanding (dancing, while it can be inspired by something, is never really “about” anything, whereas writing is almost always about something), we’ve stuck with it because it sounds so good, smacks so deeply of truth: Of course you can’t recreate in writing the way that music makes us feel. Nothing makes us feel the way we feel when we hear music. You don’t live in a blueprint, either.

Read more...

This article is from FILTER Issue 49

FILTER 49: Flying Lotus: Into The Mystic

By Colin Stutz; Photo by Chris Godley on November 6, 2012

 

FILTER 49: Flying Lotus: Into The Mystic

The Sunday mornings were always funky.

As a young teenager, Steven Ellison and his family traded weekend worship in their Baptist church for an ashram run by his aunt. Hindi bhajans replaced hymns and the sermons switched from the Gospels to a nondenominational homily: God is not omnipotent, but a power to be found inside of you. His aunt, Alice Coltrane—jazz musician and wife to the late John Coltrane—played the organ over the congregation’s otherworldly percussion and wild chanting. With magnificence and captivating intensity, his aunt led the show. God is within you, she would preach. It’s you. You’re God

Read more...

FILTER 49: Big Pictures, Bad Seeds: The Films Of John Hillcoat And Nick Cave

By Katherine Tulich on November 5, 2012

 

FILTER 49: Big Pictures, Bad Seeds: The Films Of John Hillcoat And Nick Cave

When John Hillcoat sits down for our interview at the Cabana Restaurant at the Four Seasons, he immediately relaxes when he hears a fellow Aussie accent asking the questions. Now living in Los Angeles with his family, the filmmaker is making some concessions to his new Hollywood lifestyle, even ordering a soy cappuccino. (“That’s very Californian, isn’t it?” he laughs.) Despite his peripatetic childhood in Australia, Connecticut and industrial Hamilton, Ontario, his fondest memories are of film school in Melbourne amidst the thriving pub rock scene that gave rise to some of Australia’s most internationally recognized bands like Midnight Oil and INXS. It’s where he forged his early bond with Nick Cave (a laser in Melbourne’s post-punk music scene in the late ’70s, first with The Boys Next Door and then The Birthday Party, before moving to London in 1980 and forming The Bad Seeds) and where he made his mark as a young filmmaker editing and directing music videos.

Read more...

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #19 Revisited, Getting To Know Arctic Monkeys

By Staff on October 22, 2012

 

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #19 Revisited, Getting To Know Arctic Monkeys

2012 marks FILTER Magazine's tenth year in print. To celebrate, we are looking back at some of our favorite magazine features, from July 2002’s Issue #1 all the way up to this coming November’s Issue #50.

Getting To Know is a section in the magazine that serves as a good gauge for our predictions of greatness. In FILTER ISSUE #19, released Winter 2006, we introduced the English indie rock quartet, Arctic Monkeys. Here is a brief look at the band, then and now.


Read more...

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #19 Cover Story: Cat Power

By Staff on October 19, 2012

 

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #19 Cover Story: Cat Power

2012 marks FILTER Magazine’s tenth year in print. To celebrate, we are looking back at some of our favorite magazine features, from July 2002’s Issue #1 all the way up to this coming November’s Issue #50.


Below you will find Issue #19’s cover story, in full, where we spent time with Chan Marshall of Cat Power in Miami and talked about everything from the moon, to Johnny Cash, to what sharing your music actually means. 


Read more...

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #18 Cover Story: The Flaming Lips

By Staff on October 18, 2012

 

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #18 Cover Story: The Flaming Lips

2012 marks FILTER Magazine’s tenth year in print. To celebrate, we are looking back at some of our favorite magazine features, from July 2002’s Issue #1 all the way up to this coming November’s Issue #50.


Below you can read the entire cover story from Issue #18, in which we get the honest inside scoop from Oklahoma City-bred frontman of The Flaming Lips, Wayne Coyne, regarding his personal truths, the band's growth, and organized musical mind explosions hosted in parking lots. 


Read more...

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #18 Revisited, Getting To Know Animal Collective

By Staff on October 17, 2012

 

10 Years of FILTER: Issue #18 Revisited, Getting To Know Animal Collective

2012 marks FILTER Magazine's tenth year in print. To celebrate, we are looking back at some of our favorite magazine features, from July 2002’s Issue #1 all the way up to this coming November’s Issue #50.

Getting To Know is a section in the magazine that serves as a good gauge for our predictions of greatness. In FILTER ISSUE #18, released in the Winter of 2005, we introduced you to a once little-known band by the name of Animal Collective. Here is a brief look at their career, then and now.


Read more...

GMG 41: Zola Jesus: Escape From LA

By Mike Hilleary; photos by Angel Ceballos on October 17, 2012

 

GMG 41: Zola Jesus: Escape From LA

After calling it home for the past two years, Nika Danilova is uprooting herself from Los Angeles. Sitting in her West Hollywood apartment, the blonde-haired musician otherwise known as Zola Jesus says the West Coast metropolis feels a bit stifling. “I feel like I’m living with the whole city sometimes,” she says with a laugh. “[The quarters] are a little too tight for me.”

It was here within her apartment’s permeable walls that that Danilova wrote and recorded her third full-length album, Conatus. Featuring raw, anguished vocals, icy synths, classical strings and fire-forged industrial beats, the LP saw release in the fall of 2011 to a round of positive reviews. A year later, with a transition looming, Danilova looks back at the record as a “kind of bridge in between the past and the future.”

Not looking to replicate the circumstances of an album strained by the paranoia of constantly being overheard, relocating somewhere with a bit more space and privacy is key. Born in rural Wisconsin, Danilova says she initially moved to Los Angeles because it was so drastically different from where she grew up. “Now that I’m here, I miss that [old] environment so much. I miss what it fed me.” Setting her sights on the Pacific Northwest, Danilova says her exodus may end somewhere in the state of Washington, maybe even an island in the Puget Sound. “It’s going to be like revisiting where I come from,” she says, adding, “I work better when I’m alone and when I know that I’m alone. Things just come easier and more naturally to me—because no one else is listening.”

Read more...

GMG 41: of Montreal: Silence in Heaven

By Kyle Lemmon; photos By Trompe L'Oeil Photomagique; clothes Provided By Agora on October 12, 2012

 

GMG 41: of Montreal: Silence in Heaven

Kevin Barnes wants to be alone right now. He contemplates his next aesthetical move like a chess player hunched over the battlefield. “I want to imagine myself on this island where I don’t have to engage with anybody else,” says the Athens, Georgia, native of his current situation. “The process becomes so much more meditative and therapeutic in that way.” Barnes recently woke up from a creatively fertile six-year period, or his “zombie state,” which exploded outwards from 2007’s depression-addled concept album, Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer? Personal strife at home, audacious rock-opera tours (2008’s Skeletal Lamping) and time spent under the tutelage of Los Angeles composer/producer Jon Brion (2010’s False Priest) dot of Montreal’s recent timeline. It’s a variegated résumé that is unique amongst most indie-pop musicians, but Barnes wants to clear the high bar he’s set for himself.

Polyvinyl Records’ fall release of the 17-track of Montreal odds and sods compilation Daughter of Cloud is seen by Barnes as a great crossroads, a place from where the artist can reflect on past laurels and restructure a mind that’s always bubbling with volcanic activity under its surface. Ten of the album’s songs are previously unreleased, while the other seven were originally issued on limited, rare or out-of-print CDs and seven-inches. Let it not be unsaid that of Montreal knows how to provide unequivocal fan service.

All this hand-wringing over a new musical chapter is warranted, considering of Montreal’s 11th full-length, the self-produced neo-prog suite Paralytic Stalks, which was released in February of this year. It’s a Princely sequence of shifting musical compositions that play with method like a house cat bandies a terrified mouse. When presented with his recent dalliances in cosmic outlaw country as a potential escape hatch from his typical psychedelic experiments, Barnes is diffident about tossing yet another country release into the public arena. “I feel discouraged, even though I know I could do it. I could do it on a weekend and the music could touch a lot of people or no one. I want to make something more original. Everything is slowly evolving in my head… Up to this point, every musical change has happened organically.”

Read more...

Next Ten Items

<< Newer Articles    Older Articles >>